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‎I Believe in You (Je crois en toi (English-French version)) by Il Divo on Apple Music

The "I think" part Je crois introduces an infinitive clause [moi] avoir lu ce document , "that I have read Notice that the 'moi' doesn't appear in the French sentence, but it's 'understood. Kind of cool that French has 'kept' this from Latin. Why is "que" not necessary here? One of the few things I remember in high school French was that the French never emit "that" que , so it's always "je crois que" for "I believe that ". This sentence is tripping me. Is this one used in legal matters? Notice, however, that there's nothing here corresponding to "some knowledge of particle physics.

The nearly identical sentence with "livre" instead of "document" accepted "pense" in the answer. This sentence insists on the use of "crois" and won't take "pense". As an English speaker I think you could say: It seems the 'myself' 'himself' etc. Both of these can be simplified with an infinitive clause, since the subject is the same in both clauses:. I think the simplification with an infinitive clause is specific to verbs of feelings, expression and intellectual activity. Not all of them prompt a subjunctive in the subordinate clause though.

I Believe in You (Je crois en toi)

As I understand it, this is a fine grammatical point about the use of this construction. As I understand it, if the main verb in this case 'croire' requires the subjunctive in the subordinate clause que je You have to use the infinitive form. If the main verb requires the indicative in the subordinate clause, then either is fine. I'll leave it to you to find out which 'croire' requires because I can't remember: Maybe you need the final word from someone like Sitesurf. I believe it's because, when you think about it, english uses 'think' in two ways -- to cogitate and to believe.

My hunch is that the french make a distinction. I'm pretty sure you could use both, but I believe that croire is the more common one for this sense of 'think'. I think that that that that you feel you need is optional. Don't you just love sentences like that? The tapping exercise is built with "best" sentences which are in AmEn, as you know.

In other exercises, of course "that" is provided. I'd always thought that! Americans were slightly more precise in their English usage, so I'm somewhat surprised that! I use more "that"s when writing than speaking. So I would say: You did not provide the words that for the translation! Howl are we able to get it then correct if you do not! Again you did not provide the missing word "that" in the solution.


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How can we rectify this. I cannot complete the task without you providing the tight words!! I think I have read that document. Dennis 25 17 14 14 14 14 14 14 JakeEspinoza 12 12 4. You can find numerous examples of "should of" on the internet as well. Doesn't mean it's right.

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Here are a few examples from academic publications or news sources that use a similar construction: All of your examples are in the passive voice and the object is implied. Without a subject for your infinitive, the sentence does not work. It would have to be, 'Anyone who is believed to have seen the suspect Pigslew 25 25 25 Language is defined by how it is used and 'to Google' is most definitely now used as a verb.

Bouchka1 25 25 25 15 Why not "il croit savoir tout"? Can a native speaker please explain the grammar in this sentence? Je reconnais avoir lu ce livre Have you read the Tips in the Subjunctive unit? Nikkylaw 25 6 2. Americans are slightly more precise in their English usage than who?? But I don't think it's wrong. I'm as old as the hills, and I can't remember hearing that. It may be theoretically correct,?

Raiponce - Je veux y croire

Google isn't a verb, and if it were it shouldn't be capitalized. It is possible to open an internet browser and obtain information from a platform other than google. Yeah I thought it meant "I believe having read this document". I'm not sure about the specific grammar in this sentence, but I know that the phrase "Apres avoir sometimes "etre" lu " "Having read " uses the infinitive to create an impersonal phrase, rather than conjugating the auxillary verb. Perhaps this phrase uses the infinitive for a similar effect? This was causing me some confusion until I translated it as 'I believe in having read this document' remember that croire is to believe IN then it makes sense and could br interpreted as 'I believe I have read this document'.

In French you aren't supposed to repeat the subject pronoun, but instead use the infinitive after. Just as a point of interest, I understand that, in french, the rules governing when a main verb can be has to be completed by an infinitive, as here, and when it can be completed by a subordinate clause are quite specific but complex. It depends on things like whether the main verb is in the indicative or subjunctive mode and whether the subject of the subordinate clause is the same or different that the subject of the main clause, whether it's a direct or indirect object, etc.

Those interested can clarify this for themselves, or perhaps, some kind french person would be willing to clarify it. I believe the only time a verb has a liaison with a following word is if the verb is either "est" or "ont". I'm afraid I have no idea what you're talking about. Where did you see "J'ai lu ce document"? It's possible that whygeorgia is observing that "avoir lu ce document" is in effect the infinitive version of "j'ai lu ce document," which in a way it is.

The "I think" part Je crois introduces an infinitive clause [moi] avoir lu ce document , "that I have read Notice that the 'moi' doesn't appear in the French sentence, but it's 'understood. Kind of cool that French has 'kept' this from Latin. Why is "que" not necessary here? One of the few things I remember in high school French was that the French never emit "that" que , so it's always "je crois que" for "I believe that ". This sentence is tripping me. Is this one used in legal matters? Notice, however, that there's nothing here corresponding to "some knowledge of particle physics.

The nearly identical sentence with "livre" instead of "document" accepted "pense" in the answer. This sentence insists on the use of "crois" and won't take "pense". As an English speaker I think you could say: It seems the 'myself' 'himself' etc. Both of these can be simplified with an infinitive clause, since the subject is the same in both clauses:. I think the simplification with an infinitive clause is specific to verbs of feelings, expression and intellectual activity.

Not all of them prompt a subjunctive in the subordinate clause though. As I understand it, this is a fine grammatical point about the use of this construction. As I understand it, if the main verb in this case 'croire' requires the subjunctive in the subordinate clause que je You have to use the infinitive form. If the main verb requires the indicative in the subordinate clause, then either is fine. I'll leave it to you to find out which 'croire' requires because I can't remember: Maybe you need the final word from someone like Sitesurf.


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I believe it's because, when you think about it, english uses 'think' in two ways -- to cogitate and to believe. My hunch is that the french make a distinction. I'm pretty sure you could use both, but I believe that croire is the more common one for this sense of 'think'. I think that that that that you feel you need is optional. Don't you just love sentences like that?

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The tapping exercise is built with "best" sentences which are in AmEn, as you know. In other exercises, of course "that" is provided. I'd always thought that!


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Americans were slightly more precise in their English usage, so I'm somewhat surprised that! I use more "that"s when writing than speaking. So I would say: You did not provide the words that for the translation! Howl are we able to get it then correct if you do not! Again you did not provide the missing word "that" in the solution. How can we rectify this. I cannot complete the task without you providing the tight words!!

I think I have read that document.